Brad Evans

Brad Evans is a political philosopher, critical theorist, and writer, who specializes in the problem of violence. The author of some ten books and edited volumes, along with over 50 academic and media articles, he serves as Professor of Political Violence & Aesthetics at the University of Bath, UK. Having led a dedicated series on violence for The New York Times (the Stone), he is currently the lead editor for the Histories of Violence section with The Los Angeles Review of Books. He also continues to direct the online resources centre www.historiesofviolence.com. Brad’s books have received prestigious international awards and have been translated into many languages, including Spanish, Turkish, Korean and German. Among his latest are Violence: Humans in Dark Times (with Natasha Lennard, Citylights, 2018); Histories of Violence: Post-War Critical Thought (with Terrell Carver, Zed Books, 2017); Portraits of Violence: An Illustrated History of Radical Thinking (with Sean Michael Wilson, New Internationalist, 2016); Disposable Futures: The Seduction of Violence in the Age of the Spectacle (with Henry Giroux, Citylights: 2015); Resilient Life: The Art of Living Dangerously (with Julian Reid, Polity Press, 2014); Liberal Terror (Polity Press, 2013); and Deleuze & Fascism: Security - War - Aesthetics (with Julian Reid, Routledge, 2013). Brad is currently working on a number of book projects, including The Atrocity Exhibition: Life in an Age of Total Violence (LARB Books, 2019) and Ecce Humanitas: Beholding the Pain of Humanity (Columbia University Press, 2020). He is also working on a project that explores the aesthetics of human disappearance, while writing, in his spare time, a work of fiction. Website: www.brad-evans.co.uk


CONTRIBUTOR ARTICLES

The Intimate Life of Violence

Brad Evans speaks with Elaine Scarry, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and the General Theory of Value at Harvard University....


Literary Violence

Brad Evans speaks with Tom McCarthy. A conversation in Brad Evans’s "Histories of Violence" series....


Facing the Intolerable

Jacques Rancière and how a new politics of aesthetics disrupts the way we reduce violence into mediated forms....


BLARB BLOG POSTS



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